Home Entry

House entry method 1: Doorcode
If your house has a doorcode or smartlock, enter the code in the instructions and the walker will follow your instructions upon arrival. Don’t forget to include locking instructions, and any tricks that might apply to your doorcode unit, for example:
Place your hand over the black surface, this will illuminate the buttons
The code unlocks the knob for 5-seconds, which needs to be turned clockwise
Enter the code, followed by the button at the top with the unlock symbol
Be as detailed as possible with your entry instructions to help facilitate a seamless arrival. There are many different doorcode units that each have their own unique characteristics and tricks.
House entry method 2: Lockbox
A lockbox is a secure place to store your keys and/or fob, and can be locked to a doorhandle, railing, pole, post, or fence, or, hidden somewhere out of site, like your mailbox or somewhere in the backyard

Lockboxes can be ordered through Spot using the link below, or purchased at any hardware store.
House entry method 3: Hide a Key
If you hide a key and you’re comfortable sharing its location with the walker, enter this information in the instructions and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival. Be as detailed as possible with your entry instructions to help facilitate a seamless arrival. If multiple family members use the hidden key, it’s a good idea to hide a second key for the walker(s) to use exclusively, this will eliminate the chance of a family member forgetting to return the key to its hiding spot. If you have ordered a lockbox but have walks scheduled before it arrives, hiding a key is a good short-term solution.
House entry method 4: Someone will be home
If someone will be home when the walker arrives, enter whether you would like the walker to ring the doorbell, knock, text, or call, and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival.
Building entry method 1: Lockbox
Many apartment buildings have a place specifically for lockboxes, it’s usually right out front or just inside the first door, and there are often several realtor lockboxes locked to a pole.  

Once your code is set and your lockbox is in place, enter its location and code in the instructions and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival. Be as detailed as possible to help facilitate a seamless arrival. If the location is not obvious, use descriptive instructions, for example, turn left when facing the front door and you’ll see the lockbox attached to the 3rd railing from the top of the stairs. If there are multiple lockboxes attached to the same railing, use descriptive instructions, for example, the lockbox is a black rectangle with a silver switch at the top, and 4 silver digits running vertically below the switch. 

Ideally, you will put whatever is required to gain entry into the building and unit inside the lockbox. Such as a fob to get into the building and a key to get into the unit. If this is not an option, have a look through the other 4 entry methods for buildings.
Building entry method 2: Building Buzzercode
Using a building buzzercode is another option, but its slightly less convenient as you will have to be near your phone when the walker arrives, and when they return with your dog at the end of the walk. You will also need to provide access to your unit, which can be done with any of the following methods: 
Leave your unit door unlocked
Hide a key somewhere outside of your unit (under the mat)
Hang a lockbox from your unit door handle
If you work a busy job and can’t always check your phone, using a building buzzer code might not be the best home entry option for you. If you decide to use your building buzzer code, enter the code and unit entry instructions and the walker will follow your instructions upon arrival. If you use a building buzzer code, don’t forget that the walker will also need to be buzzed in when they return with your dog at the end of the walk.
Building entry method 3: Concierge
If your building has full-time concierge, enter the instructions required to contact the concierge and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival. Make sure to contact the concierge prior to booking, to confirm that there aren’t any policies that would prohibit the concierge from letting a walker into the building and unit.
House entry method 1: Doorcode
If your house has a doorcode or smartlock, enter the code in the instructions and the walker will follow your instructions upon arrival. Don’t forget to include locking instructions, and any tricks that might apply to your doorcode unit, for example:
- Place your hand over the black surface, this will illuminate the buttons
- The code unlocks the knob for 5-seconds, which needs to be turned clockwise
- Enter the code, followed by the button at the top with the unlock symbol
Be as detailed as possible with your entry instructions to help facilitate a seamless arrival. There are many different doorcode units that each have their own unique characteristics and tricks.
House entry method 2: Lockbox
A lockbox is a secure place to store your keys and/or fob, and can be locked to a doorhandle, railing, pole, post, or fence, or, hidden somewhere out of site, like your mailbox or somewhere in the backyard.

Lockboxes can be ordered through Spot using the link below, or purchased at any hardware store.
House entry method 3: Hide a Key
If you hide a key and you’re comfortable sharing its location with the walker, enter this information in the instructions and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival. Be as detailed as possible with your entry instructions to help facilitate a seamless arrival. If multiple family members use the hidden key, it’s a good idea to hide a second key for the walker(s) to use exclusively, this will eliminate the chance of a family member forgetting to return the key to its hiding spot. If you have ordered a lockbox but have walks scheduled before it arrives, hiding a key is a good short-term solution.
House entry method 4: Someone will be home
If someone will be home when the walker arrives, enter whether you would like the walker to ring the doorbell, knock, text, or call, and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival.
Building entry method 1: Lockbox
Many apartment buildings have a place specifically for lockboxes, it’s usually right out front or just inside the first door, and there are often several realtor lockboxes locked to a pole.  

Once your code is set and your lockbox is in place, enter its location and code in the instructions and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival. Be as detailed as possible to help facilitate a seamless arrival. If the location is not obvious, use descriptive instructions, for example, turn left when facing the front door and you’ll see the lockbox attached to the 3rd railing from the top of the stairs. If there are multiple lockboxes attached to the same railing, use descriptive instructions, for example, the lockbox is a black rectangle with a silver switch at the top, and 4 silver digits running vertically below the switch. 

Ideally, you will put whatever is required to gain entry into the building and unit inside the lockbox. Such as a fob to get into the building and a key to get into the unit. If this is not an option, have a look through the other 4 entry methods for buildings.
Building entry method 2: Building Buzzercode
Using a building buzzercode is another option, but it's slightly less convenient as you will have to be near your phone when the walker arrives, and when they return with your dog at the end of the walk. You will also need to provide access to your unit, which can be done with any of the following methods: 
- Leave your unit door unlocked
- Hide a key somewhere outside of your unit (under the mat)
- Hang a lockbox from your unit door handle
If you work a busy job and can’t always check your phone, using a building buzzer code might not be the best home entry option for you. If you decide to use your building buzzer code, enter the code and unit entry instructions and the walker will follow your instructions upon arrival. If you use a building buzzer code, don’t forget that the walker will also need to be buzzed in when they return with your dog at the end of the walk.
Building entry method 3: Concierge
If your building has full-time concierge, enter the instructions required to contact the concierge and the walker will follow these instructions upon arrival. Make sure to contact the concierge prior to booking, to confirm that there aren’t any policies that would prohibit the concierge from letting a walker into the building and unit.

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I order a replacement lockbox?

Replacement lockboxes are $20 and arrive by mail within 1-3 business days. Lockboxes are yours to keep. You can update the code to your lockbox anytime.

Tap (Menu) > Replacement Lockboxes > Order Lockbox > Request Lockbox

How do I update my Walk & Entry Instructions?

There are 3 ways to update your Walk & Entry Instructions:

When booking a walk: Tap (Book) or (Find Walkers) on the Homepage
In My Pups: Tap (Menu) > My Pups > Walker Instructions
In My Account: Tap (Menu) > My Account > Walker Instructions

What happens when the walker has arrived and my key is missing?

When a walker arrives and the key is not where it’s supposed to be, Spot implements the following procedure to exhaust every possible option in an attempt to gain access to the home/dog:

  1. The walker and Spot Support each have another thorough read through the entry instructions to make sure we aren't missing something.
  2. The walker double checks to make sure they are at the correct address. 
  3. The walker sends the dog owner an in-app message to let them know the key is missing and asks whether they have any other means of entry.
  4. The walker rings the doorbell, knocks, then tries opening the door to see if it’s unlocked. 
  5. The walker starts the walk timer.
  6. The walker tries calling the dog owner using the emergency contact number.
  7. The walker sends the dog owner a text message, in case their Spot notifications are turned off and they can't pickup calls at work.
  8. The walker waits for a response from the owner for the full paid walk time, as often, an owner will respond with a solution with enough time for a shortened walk.

What is the walker arrival procedure when my doorcode is not working?

When a walker arrives and the doorcode is not working, Spot implements the following procedure to exhaust every possible option in an attempt to gain access to the home/dog:

  1. The walker and Spot Support each have another thorough read through the entry instructions to make sure we aren't missing something.
  2. The walker double checks to make sure they are at the correct address. 
  3. Spot Support reads the dog owner’s previous chats in an attempt to find an updated code, backup means of entry, or any tips and tricks specific to the doorcode.
  4. The walker rings the doorbell, knocks, then tries opening the door to see if it’s unlocked. 
  5. If there is a number sign, the walker tries the code followed by the number sign. If there is a star button, the walker tries the code followed by the star button. If there is a lock button, the walker tries the code followed by the lock button.   
  6. If there is a logo with the word "Schlage" or any other logo that is also a button, the walker tries the code followed by that button. 
  7. If there is a keyhole attached to a knob near the top of the unit, the walker enters the code and turns that knob, as the code may unlock the knob portion, which is what must be turned in order to unlock the deadbolt.
  8. If the walker is experiencing flashing, beeping, or some other electrical sensation, the walker will leave the unit alone for 1 full minute, and try all of the above troubleshooting techniques. 
  9. The walker tries all of the above troubleshooting techniques while pulling the door towards them, it’s possible the lock is not flush with the door and might be stuck. 
  10. If it’s a house, the walker will check to see if there is a back door with a doorcode unit. 
  11. The walker starts the walk timer. 
  12. The walker sends Spot Support a picture of the doorcode unit for further troubleshooting.
  13. The walker sends the dog owner an in-app message asking whether they have any tips or tricks.
  14. The walker rings the doorbell, knocks, then tries opening the door to see if it’s unlocked. 
  15. The walker tries calling the dog owner using the emergency contact number.
  16. The walker sends the dog owner a text message, in case their Spot notifications are turned off and they can't pickup calls at work.
  17. The walker waits for a response from the owner for the full paid walk time, as often, an owner will respond with a solution with enough time for a shortened walk. 

What is the walker arrival procedure when the dog owner is unresponsive? 

When a walker arrives and the owner has instructions to buzz, ring, knock, text or call, and the dog owner is not answering, Spot implements the following procedure to exhaust every possible option in an attempt to gain access to the home/dog:

  1. The walker starts the walk timer if they are not able to get in within a few minutes.
  2. The walker sends the dog owner an in-app message.
  3. The walker and Spot Support each have another thorough read through the entry instructions to make sure we aren't missing something.
  4. The walker tries calling the owner using the emergency contact number listed on the walk page.
  5. The walker sends the dog owner a text message, in case their Spot notifications are turned off and they can't pickup calls at work.
  6. The walker continues trying every 5-10 minutes for the full paid walk time, as often, an owner will respond with enough time for a shortened walk.

What is the walker arrival procedure when the key is not working?

When a walker arrives and the key is not working, Spot implements the following procedure to exhaust every possible option in an attempt to gain access to the home/dog:

  1. The walker and Spot Support each have another thorough read through the entry instructions to make sure we aren't missing something.
  2. Spot Support reads the dog owner’s previous chats in an attempt to find a solution, backup means of entry, or any tips and tricks specific to the door.
  3. If there are multiple locks on the door, the walker makes sure they have tried both, and makes sure they aren’t accidentally locking one while unlocking the other.
  4. The walker tries turning the key, while pulling the door. The lock might not be flush with the door, and it might be sticking.
  5. The walker tries inserting the key all the way, then pulling it out a few millimeters while trying to turn it both ways. Sometimes the key will not turn when it's inserted all the way and just needs to be pulled out slightly to catch the lock.
  6. If the key will not enter the lock hole, the walker tries wiggling it in, sometimes keys just need the right touch.
  7. The walker tries try turning the key in the opposite direction, some locks are backwards.
  8. The walker looks for any other door and tries the key in that door. 
  9. The walker starts the walk timer.
  10. The walker sends Spot Support a picture of the key and lock for further troubleshooting.
  11. The walker sends the dog owner an in-app message to ask whether they have any tips or tricks.
  12. The walker rings the doorbell, knocks, then tries opening the door to see if it’s unlocked. 
  13. The walker tries calling the owner using the emergency contact number listed on the walk page.
  14. The walker sends the dog owner a text message, in case their Spot notifications are turned off and they can't pickup calls at work.
  15. The walker waits for a response from the owner for the full paid walk time, as often, an owner will respond with a solution with enough time for a shortened walk.

What is the walker arrival procedure when the lockbox is missing?

When a walker arrives and the lockbox is not where it’s supposed to be, Spot implements the following procedure to exhaust every possible option in an attempt to gain access to the home/dog:

  1. The walker and Spot Support each have another thorough read through the entry instructions to make sure we aren't missing something.
  2. The walker double checks to make sure they are at the correct address. 
  3. Spot Support reads the dog owner’s previous chats in an attempt to find a backup means of entry. 
  4. The walker sends the dog owner an in-app message to let them know the lockbox is missing and asks whether they have any other means of entry.
  5. The walker rings the doorbell, knocks, then tries opening the door to see if it’s unlocked. 
  6. The walker starts the walk timer.
  7. The walker tries calling the owner using the emergency contact number listed on the walk page.
  8. The walker sends the dog owner a text message, in case their Spot notifications are turned off and they can't pickup calls at work.
  9. The walker waits for a response from the owner for the full paid walk time, as often, an owner will respond with a solution with enough time for a shortened walk.
What is the walker arrival procedure when the lockbox is not opening?

When a walker arrives and the lockbox is not opening, Spot implements the following procedure to exhaust every possible option in an attempt to gain access to the home/dog:

  1. The walker sends Spot support a picture of the lockbox and Spot Support researches the lockbox’ instructions and troubleshooting techniques.
  2. The walker and Spot Support each have another thorough read through the entry instructions to make sure we aren't missing something.
  3. The walker double checks to make sure they are at the correct address. 
  4. Spot Support reads the dog owner’s previous chats in an attempt to find a backup means of entry. 
  5. The walker shakes the lockbox, if they can’t hear a key rattling inside it’s likely that a large keychain that is pushing up against the faceplate and blocking the unlock switch inside. The walker tries giving the lockbox a good hard shake and/or hitting it hard a few times in an effort to move/free up the keychain inside. The walker tried squeezing the faceplate as hard as they can while opening the latch.
  6. The walker tries prying the latch down with a key or rock. 
  7. It’s possible the numbers appear to be lined up correctly, but one might need to be moved slightly away from center to engage the unlock portion. The walker tries jiggling each of the numbers back and forth slightly off center, one by one, while attempting to push down the silver latch.
  8. If the weather is cold, it's possible the lockbox could be slightly frozen. If they suspect this is the case, the walker tries blowing their warm breath onto the lockbox for a minute or two before trying again.
  9. Spot support contacts the dog owner.
Who sees my Walk & Entry Instructions?

Only your scheduled walker has access to your Walk & Entry Instructions. When requesting a walk, dog walkers who service your location are notified, they can view the date, arrival timeframe, length of walk, and your pup profile. Once available walkers begin to accept, you can review their profiles, start chatting, and accept the walker of your choice. Once you accept a walker, the walk is scheduled, and the walker will have access to your Walk & Entry Instructions.

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